dark-as-light
astronomicalwonders:

A peek into the Tarantula Nebula - 30 Doradus
Like lifting a giant veil, the near-infrared vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope uncovers a dazzling new view deep inside the Tarantula Nebula. Hubble reveals a glittering treasure trove of more than 800,000 stars and protostars embedded inside the nebula.
These observations were obtained as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Program. When complete, the program will produce a large catalog of stellar properties, which will allow astronomers to study a wide range of important topics related to star formation.
Credit: NASA/Hubble

astronomicalwonders:

A peek into the Tarantula Nebula - 30 Doradus

Like lifting a giant veil, the near-infrared vision of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope uncovers a dazzling new view deep inside the Tarantula Nebula. Hubble reveals a glittering treasure trove of more than 800,000 stars and protostars embedded inside the nebula.

These observations were obtained as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Program. When complete, the program will produce a large catalog of stellar properties, which will allow astronomers to study a wide range of important topics related to star formation.

Credit: NASA/Hubble

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astronomicalwonders:

The Eta Carinae regions of the Carina Nebula
This panoramic view combines a new image of the field around the Wolf–Rayet star WR 22 in the Carina Nebula with an earlier picture of the region around the unique star Eta Carinae in the heart of the nebula. The picture was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile.
Credit: ESO/La Silla

astronomicalwonders:

The Eta Carinae regions of the Carina Nebula

This panoramic view combines a new image of the field around the Wolf–Rayet star WR 22 in the Carina Nebula with an earlier picture of the region around the unique star Eta Carinae in the heart of the nebula. The picture was created from images taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Credit: ESO/La Silla